8 Retro Cocktails That Deserve a Comeback

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Manhattan Cocktail

Sometime in the late 1800s, someone in New York mixed whiskey, vermouth, and bitters to create the Manhattan. The recipe for this cocktail was first documented in print in the 1890s.
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Grasshopper Cocktail

The color and taste of this sweet, minty, after-dinner beverage come from crème de menthe. Invented in 1918 in New Orleans, the grasshopper gained popularity in the American South in the 1950s and 1960s.
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Tom Collins

The Tom Collins is first documented in writing in 1876. The highball drink became popular in bars by the end of that decade.
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Old Fashioned

In the latter part of the 1800s, a mixture of whiskey, sugar, water, and bitters was developed and marketed as the Old Fashioned. Although the origins of the drink are up for debate, it is undeniable that the Old Fashioned
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Sazerac

The main association of the Sazerac is with New Orleans, where it originated. The drink's name comes from the original cognac used in it, Sazerac de Forge et Fils, though rye whiskey is frequently substituted in its place.
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Brandy Alexander

Created in the early 1900s, the Brandy Alexander is a concoction of cognac, crème de cacao, and cream that gained popularity very rapidly. A reimagining of the classic Alexander cocktail
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Sidecar

A variation on the sour, the sidecar is made with cognac, orange liqueur, and lemon juice. It is thought to have started in the late 1910s in either London or Paris.
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Gimlet

The gimlet is a beverage that is made with lime juice and gin (or vodka) that is thought to have been invented in the eighteenth century by British Royal Navy soldiers.